Have YOU Ever Had a Panic Attack?

Have YOU Ever Had a Panic Attack?

July 11, 2016 | Posted in: Anxiety, Chronic Illness and anxiety, Lyme Disease

Have you ever had a panic attack?

The question hung between us like angry, rain-saturated clouds positioning overhead.

For me, the answer was obvious. Panic attacks are a common, unfortunate part of battling with Lyme disease and coinfections. But my relationship with panic attacks pre-dates my relationship with Lyme Disease.

I have been married twice. Twice I have picked out a gown, attended showers in my honor, pranced down an aisle and committed my life to the groom found waiting for me at the end. Once, this groom and I dismantled the life we’d built. We hurt each other deeply. And as I saw the end of our union barreling towards me, as I attempted to adjust to living alone for the first time in my life, as I worked to process the shame and loss of a failed marriage, I was introduced to panic in its rawest form.

These episodes were intense and unlike anything I had ever experienced before. They often reduced me to rocking back and forth on all fours or curling up into the fetal position, heart pounding seemingly outside of my chest. They seemed to be birthed by a thought, a “truth” too painful to bear, the weight of which induced sheer panic I could not control. These “truths” varied by the day or moment but they might have been, “I will always be alone” or “I always make the wrong decision.” One day after the separation while driving around and around SeaWorld unable to find the entrance it was, “I am unable to provide proper care for my son. I don’t deserve to be a parent.”

Over time, I learned to “talk myself down” from these episodes, to soothe myself away from these “truths,” to breathe, to disentangle fears from truths. I also spent years in the plush corner chair of a kind and capable counselor’s office doing the good, hard work of healing. In time, the panic faded to black, became a memory.

And then, Lyme disease brought on a different sort of panic attack. I can only describe these as feeling somehow “chemical” in nature. They were unattached to any sort of thought or feeling. There seemed to be no specific triggers. They just “were.” As such, they were free to attach themselves to the most benign of events and difficult to “talk yourself down” from. If a panic attack showed up because of some chemical trigger and not an emotional one, the panic itself was free to attach itself to whatever it wanted, like the last email I received, or the fact I’d just noticed we were out of milk. But all the self-talk in the world didn’t change anything, because these things weren’t the actual trigger.

These “chemical” panic attacks became endurance-focused. And then elimination focused­–­­­were there certain foods or meds setting them off or making them worse?

How in the world did we get rid of them? (The “we” here being my doctor and I)

And I confess to you that although the last few years have been riddled with many symptoms and diagnoses, this one sent me over an invisible edge. It seemed somehow more unacceptable than others. It felt like one I couldn’t, shouldn’t talk about.

Why? Because clearly only “weak” people have panic attacks. Don’t believe me?

Just ask her, the one sitting at my table, telling me she believes we use panic attacks as an excuse. Just ask the people you know who’ve never had one. Unfortunately, their answers might sound like:

You just need to pray more.

Are you sure that’s not just all in your head?

Well, I’ve been through a lot and I’ve never had one, so I’m pretty sure that says something.

You control your own body so you just aren’t trying hard enough.

But you and I both know none of these things are true. Panic attacks do not make us “less than.” Click To Tweet They do not define us any more so than any other physical symptom we may be experiencing.

And while there are many different ways to deal with panic attacks—which are as individual as their triggers, please know this:

Answering “yes” to the question, “Have you ever had a panic attack?” doesn’t make you worth less.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10 Comments

  1. Vera
    July 11, 2016

    Leave a Reply

    Hi Stacey! This is such a great post! I found myself wanting more at the end…lol
    What a great way to talk about panic attacts. Other women need to hear what you have to say on this subject because it will help them along their path to healing.
    Most women are scared to talk about this subject and depression for that matter!
    My passion is to help women who are hurting, get the help they need to get healthier so they can move forward with their lives. Thank you for posting this! I will be sharing it with others I know can relate and get much from reading it!

    • Stacey Philpot
      July 12, 2016

      Leave a Reply

      Thank you, Vera! Yes, there is so much fear and shame associated with this topic. It’s time to drag it into the light and strip it of it’s power!

  2. Norma Gail
    July 11, 2016

    Leave a Reply

    Thanks for opening up! I know it will help many!

  3. Marie
    July 11, 2016

    Leave a Reply

    great post. I don’t know how to help those with them. I know several that have them and would love to know more on what to do to support them.

    Marie
    spreading-joy.org
    @spreadingJOY

  4. Rosie
    July 11, 2016

    Leave a Reply

    Thank you for being open and honest about your life, it is appreciated!!

  5. Marisa
    July 11, 2016

    Leave a Reply

    Thank you for giving a face and a voice to this problem! I’ve suffered with chronic anxiety most of my life, and been on the verge of several panic attacks. They all seemed to appear out of nowhere. Like you said, they weren’t the result of a specific trigger. Pretty much anything could set them off if I was feeling anxious. I’ve discovered that since they are a result of a chemical imbalance, I need to watch my diet. It is so hard to describe these feelings to someone who doesn’t understand, but I’m so glad to know I’m not alone! Thank you also for saying I am not “less than”. 🙂

    • Stacey Philpot
      July 12, 2016

      Leave a Reply

      You are a warrior! Thanks for fighting along side me.

  6. Jess
    July 12, 2016

    Leave a Reply

    Had my first couple of major panic attacks within the last week, so I really needed to hear this right now- thank you! Jess x

  1. Reblog: Have YOU Ever Had a Panic Attack? — Chronically Whole | 'Enability' blog - […] via Have YOU Ever Had a Panic Attack? — Chronically Whole […]

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